Every Bill or Policy Proposal Should Have These Three Required Items

I’m certainly not an expert, but it seems really hard to have good discussions and arrive at the right decisions on proposed laws and policies, because there are so many trade-offs, unintended consequences, and less-than-forthright people involved.

I really think the country would be better off if every policy proposal were accompanied by these 3 required items:

(1) specific source for the ideas, supporting data/arguments and language being proposed (highlighting all direct and indirect lobbyist input);

(2) likely and possible trade-offs and negative externalities if what’s proposed takes place (sources to include a range of experts in the field and public comments); and

(3) short and long term costs and specific (committed) sources to pay these costs (or must specify “unfunded — will be added to government debt”)

#BetterGovernment

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Between 3 and 9 feet tall

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Mark Gavagan

Mark Gavagan

Between 3 and 9 feet tall

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